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call engineering from union college in new york. our next witness is dr. shirley ann jackson president of the pollty -- prior to her tenure, mr. dr. jackson served as the chair. she also is had a career working in several physics laboratories and researching sub anatomic particles. she earned her ph.d. in elementary particle physics from m.i.t. our final witness is dr. charles vest president of the national academy of engineering. he was elected to the position in 2007 and serving a six-year term. dr. vest also is the president of the montana institute of technology and earned the ph.d. in mechanical engineering from the university of michigan. prior to his time in the academic world, the doctor was vice chair of the u.s. counsel of competitiveness for eight years and a member of the president's committee of advisers on science and technology during the bush and clinton administrations. both dr. vest and dr. jackson were also distinguished members of the panel that -- the 2005 national academy study rising above the gathering storm. it recommended ways to keep america economic economic
and said use your good office with the president jackson. tell him he should pardon arthur, you know, his mother is very good. as she said, you know, the execution would be worse that night crime. and that she couldn't contemplate that arthur would be executed. he objects and unmoved and so the clock keeps ticking. >>> you can watch this and other programs online at booktv.org. >>> at age 25 one of the waitest widow and during the revolution,
much. [applause] >> the best day to be a planet in america was july 9, 2004, when dick jackson and lawrence frank came out with a book called urban sprawl and public health. and what the book finally did, some technical epidemiological meet on the social logic of those that we've been arguing about and said no uncertain terms, the suburbs are killing us and here's why. and cities can save us and here's why. by far the greatest aspect of the epidemic, i should say of our health challenges in america is the obesity epidemic. it's not that obesity itself is a problem but all these illnesses that obesity leads to. principal among them diabetes. diabetes now consumes 2% of our gdp. a child born after 2000 has a one in three chance in america becoming a diabetic. when i look at the first generation of americans who are going to live shorter lives than their parents. is probably not a huge surprise to you. we've all been talking about longtime about the wonders of the american corn syrup diet, and only reason as the argument have the studies been done comparing diet and physical inact
. really appreciated the article in "politico," mr. templeton and dr. jackson. the testimony contains many common elements indeed their topics frequently discussed in this room, especially importance of promoting s.t.e.m. education in maine gaming americas leadership position in the global economy. what i'm talking with constituents and industry leaders about the topic in my district in oregon, especially the role creativity and integration play in driving our economy forward. many express the education integrating arts and design in stem fields, innovative companies across my district across companies like nike and tech giants like intel rely on employees at the mine for science and eye for design. we discussed how science education can yield the innovative workforce that many of you identify is essential. beyond the benefit for the industry but in art and design can help keep students engaged and he talked about trying students in and i want to tell you i visited an elementary school in my district that took s.t.e.m. and added arts and design. biscuits are engaged, acting things have, st
like to congratulate the gentlelady from texas, ms. jackson lee for her appointment as ranking member of the subcommittee. we've had the opportunity to work together previously and we've had some meetings before we started scheduling that the hearings come the summer looking forward to working together to strengthen our nation's border. i'd also like to recognize the republican members of the committee with us. first of all, jeff duncan in south carolina, a veteran of the subcommittee and a second term in congress as well and were looking forward to seeing some of the committee in a sort they want to congratulate him as well as being selected on the chairman oversights that canadian homeland. excited to welcome him back. steve peluso from mississippi is with us. he's a cpa come united states marine, veteran of the persian gulf war and still is in the army national guard of mississippi, so we appreciate service to the country and congress and looking forward to interest and maritime issues in particular. congressmen barletta is here from pennsylvania, a former mayor a few thoughts in a
with them. they delighted in him them all their lives. it was wonderful. andrew jackson, for example, rear of the sun. andrew jackson junior was one of a set of twins. they day one of the twins to the jackson's two race. it was an odd back then, but it would be today. they all stayed in close touch. >> [inaudible question] >> i would love to tell you that, but unfortunately they did not let me choose. [laughter] the publisher chose the objects in the picture. they were basically looking for 18th century iconic objects. at one point he had mount vernon in the background, which i thought was a very keen idea. except it was the present-day mount vernon which did not exist at that time. i sent back a picture of what mount vernon look like, they sent it back and said it was not grand enough. [laughter] >> are there any other questions? is not, thank you so much. i have loved talking with you. [applause] back. >> at age 25, she was one of the wealthiest in the colonies. the british threatened to take her hostage and later she would become the nation's first lady. meet martha washington and he st
personal physician. he was a personal physician to angela davis. he also sought george jackson commissaries never joined the party. this is at a time in oakland and listen in turn and oakland highland hospital. he helped the party to strategize about sickle cell anemia program organized and the southwest he helped the party around chapters, educating the rank-and-file members. >> host: why are you writing about this now? is the health care debate we just had in this country? >> guest: i jot those connections in the boat. part of what's interesting is 45 years after the black panther party was founded, we still have fundamental issues talking about the issues that have come back and public discourse with regard to the affordable care act. we should pay for her, should everyone have a baseline level of help cared this are precisely the issues to 45 years ago panthers were talking about. they seem far more radical. obviously still right now, but it's interesting that the third circuit shifted into mainstream discourse in a particular sort of way. i think also i'm writing about this now because
.com/booktv. >> the best day to be a player in america was july 9, 2004, when dick jackson, holly from dan, and lawrence frank came out with a book about public health. what i did was put some epidemiological meet on the sociological bones that we planners have been arguing about. the suburbs are killing us, here is why. the greatest aspect of that epidemic, or our health challenges is the obesity epidemic. it's not the obesity itself is the problem, but all of this illness is that it leads to. diabetes consumes 2% of our gross national product. a child born after the year 2051 in three chance of becoming a diabetic. we are now looking at the first generation of americans who are going to live shorter lives than their parents. that is probably not a huge surprise to you. we have all been talking about the wonders of the american diet and the sodas that we are drinking. only recently has the argument and have the studies been done comparing diet and physical inactivity. one doctor at the mayo clinic for patients and electronic underwear and measured every motion. set a certain diet regime and some people
whether there's a real public health benefit but i think he makes a good point. >> mr. stuart jackson. >> it has been to since the landmark medical research council report made a direct link between the prevention of nerve defects in childbearing women. such a spina bifida. this policy is mired and democracy between the food standards agency, the apartment of health and others. will the prime minister do everything he can give his reassurance to the house that he will unblock this log jam to prevent the entirely preventable conditions of hydrocephalus and spina bifida? >> i will look very carefully what my boyfriend has said. it is really true conditions like spina bifida have come down and it's certainly true that it has an important role to play it. in terms of the specific points he makes and the bureaucratic problems identified, i will look at that nebraska the department of health to write you about it. >> mr. speaker, with reece petty, among make my apology, a letter from my constituents of the disabled, we will -- [inaudible] therefore i need a spare room on those alone. i feel
to be a planner in america was july 9, 2004, when dick jackson, howie frumpkin and lawrence frank came out with a book called "urban sprawl and public health." and what that book finally did was put some technical epidemiological meat on the sociological bones that we plan ors have been arguing about and said in no uncertain terms the suburbs are killing us, and here's why, and cities are safe us, and here's why. by far the greatest aspect of the epidemic is the obesity epidemic. all the illnesses that obesity leads to. principle among them diabetes. diabetes now consumes 2% of our gross national product. a child born after 2000 has a one in three chance in america of becoming a diabetic. we are now looking at the first generation of americans who are going to live shorter lives than their parents. that's probably not a huge surprise to you. we've all been talking now for a long time about the wonders of the american corn syrup-based diet and the 40 ounce and 08 ounce sodas people are drinking, but only recently have the studies been done comparing diet and physical inactivity. one of them
of heavy jackson that was there. >> guest: yes, and i listened to lots of recordings of that speech. i had never quite heard that. maybe she allowed stage whispering and i want to believe that story. >> host: she loved him. the reason i'm at dr. king was because i was staying at her home in chicago as a young girl and dr. king would come by there and as a matter of fact i met him the day after he was hit in the head at guage part. remember the story click to talk about the story about him getting hit in the head in illinois. did you meet dr. king. >> guest: i only saw him from a distance. >> host: how close were you? >> guest: i tried to get as close as i could about a foot from the lincoln memorial but the notion as a 19-year-old that i would actually shake hands with him, that would have been the thrill of my life. i only saw him speak twice and both times i saw him as a member of the crowd. he came to ucla when i was student there and spoke so that was the other time. this was maybe 1965 something like that. >> host: how did that impact you? you have this long jersey on -- journey on th
turned this into what jesse jackson turned it as among white man tracks down black man and shoots him in back of head. he was shot in the chest. severely injured in that fight, having his head pounded against the pavement. the way the media played it is that george zimmerman had not been injured, stocking and for fun and decided to shoot a black guy for a reason in the cut the 911 tapes. they took the tape in which he was specifically asked what is the race of the person you're following. he says he's black. nbc cut the tape. the cut of the entire exchange. he had to be prompted for the race. the reason that mattered was that they used this incident as an excuse to push liberal policy. they send al sharpton down and talk about how the sanford police to margaret is massively racist which is just a symptom of the believable race provision in america. has it does all the time. president obama and many others put it cy. this is just one black guy. it happens all the time. that's the kind of country we live in. this argument rose all the way to the level of the presidency with the presiden
in the first place. the media turned this into what jesse jackson term debt as, white man, black man shoots him, it wasn't shot in the back of the head but in the chest, george zimmerman was severely injured in that fight, having his head pound against the pavement, there were pictures of it. away the media played is george zimmerman had ever been injured, george zimmerman was stalking him for fun and decided to issue a black guy for no reason and they cut the 911 take to make it look like that. he is being sued because of that. they took the 911 take in which george zimmerman was this request with the raise of the person you're following, he said he is black. nbc cut that tape so what it sounds like george zimmerman is saying is he looks suspicious, he is black. they cut out the extent entire exchange with the dispatcher. he had to be prompted for the raise. the reason that matters is the these the fresh point incidents as an excuse to the liberal policy. here's our work, send al sharpton down to talk about how the stanford police department is massively racist and that in general is a symptom
. and 11 members of the rna are arrested and they're paraded through jackson half naked. and one of the neighbors calls back to detroit and since this is happening. and one of the members of the rna, so the lawyer then called conyers office to tell them what's happening and to try to get conyers office to intercede and basically try to protect so these people don't get killed. because there's been a shootout, and officer or to have been shot. and its rosa parks it's important basically calls and calls and calls the department of justice until she gets assurance in that kind of like weird way where it's like no, thethey're not being her but noy will get hurt. and she, at a very much a tribute her kind of quickness and her kind of getting on the phone to the department of justice of saving their lives. and the lawyer is heading the rna at the point says that he would then call passionate he's in prison for the next five years on conspiracy charges, and she just repeatedly called and she says hello, this is rosa parks calling and just to show them that she was watching. so to me it
jackson half and one of the neighbors call us back to detroit and says this is happening. one of the members, so then cause conyers on faith and to get contraceptives to intercede and try to protect for these people don't just get killed because there's been a shootout of an officer. two had been shot and it's rosa parks who basically did on the phone calls until she gets an assurance in that weird way recite their not being hurt, but nobody will get hurt. they very much attribute her quickness to saving their lives and a mario bertinelli says she would then call. he's in prison for the next five years on conspiracy charges and she repeatedly calls and says hello this is rosa calling. just to show them she was watching. so to me that speaks to both her firmness and disability unsure and ability to kind of do things. so ed von ran a bookstore and each rate and he talked about her. they would go to the bookstore of the time. there is all these discussion groups and activists groups that came out of the bookstore and she would attend many of their forearms. he was saying to me, h
are arrested to and paraded through jackson half naked. one of the neighbors called back to detroit and said this is happening and one member of the rna called conyers's office to tell them what is set in and get conyers's office to intercede and protect some people don't get killed because there has been issued out, an officer had been shot. rosa parks gets on loan, the department of justice, she gets an assurance in that weird way, nobody will get hurt and they very much attribute her kind of quickness and getting on the phone to the department of justice saving their lives. the head of the rna says she would then call, in prison for the next five years on conspiracy charges and she repeatedly calls and says this is rosa parks calling and just to show them that she was walking, to me that speaks of her firmness and disability to view things, she attended -- edward bond wrote a book store in detroit and talks about her like she -- would go into the bookstore all-time and there were all these discussion groups and activist groups that came out of the bookstore and she would attend many of th
1807 to 1857. president madison, john quincy adam, monroe, and fill more, and andrew jackson were all inaugurated in the room that we are in. and we're now join by just a second termer from florida, his name is dennis roth, and he is a republican from the 15th 15th district. mr. roth, overall, the tone of the president's speech. this is your third or fourth state of the union, correct? >> correct mitchell -- correct. my fourth one -- my third. the tone was moderate and i mean that he was correct. we can't cut our way into prosperity by cutting our spending. but what we needs to say is to go further and say we can grow our way into prosperity, and the only way to grow into sprues spirit is if we give some incentives to bring back the jobs to america and bring back investment to america that creates jobs. one thing he talked about was the simpson-bowles act. it has taken him three years to bring it up. i filed a bill memorialaalizeing the plan. i think we need to reform or tax system and eliminate tax loopholes and exemptions, create on incentive so business will thrive again in this co
gases and emissions are causing global warming, that's fine. you can believe it. lisa jackson, director of the epa, in fact, obama's director made this statement in response, live on tv, to my question. if we pass this cap-and-trade, it's going to cost between $30,400,000,000,000 a year, largest tax increase in history this country. is this going to reduce co2 emissions? she said that while. the reason is the problem is that here. it's in china, india, mexico, other countries. those three have problems to manufacturing base moving overseas because they have to go where there is energy and if we curtail or energy over here but that tax won't reduce emissions come is still manufacturing to go someplace. >> host: senator inhofe was the ranking member on the environment and public works committee and on the 113, besides the top republican on the senate armed services committee. bobby in birmingham, alabama, go ahead. >> caller: morning. how you doing, sir? i listen to the president last night. with all the things in north korea and other places, are we in a position right now to have a weak
politics & prose bookstore in washington, d.c. >> after president-elect andrew jackson's wife died in the simpler 1840, her knees assumed the role of first lady. >> emily was perfect. for all the negatives washington had to say about andrew jackson, they loved emily. she sort of covered everything. the women all liked her, and as it was to happen, the women's opinions that meant more than people thought in washington, that she, emily, became his acting first lady. she entertained beautifully. she was polished. some people thought oh, she's rude and rustic from the country. she knew exactly how to do things. >> emily donelson, one of the women who served as first lady and c-span's new series, examined the public and private lives in a first of its kind project for television. season one begins this monday, presidents' day, at 9 p.m. eastern and pacific on c-span, c-span radio and c-span.org. >> president obama has signed an executive order establishing voluntary cybersecurity standards that would improve information sharing and bolster collaborative efforts among federal agencies an
jackson junior appeared in court today. they spent $750,000 in campaign funds on personal items, it is alleged. both of them, congressman jackson and his wife, are appearing separately in court today. the ex-congressman said last week that he fully accepts responsibility responsibility for the improper decisions and mistakes he has made. the defense secretary, leon panetta, is one of his civilian work force to get ready for furloughs when the sequester those into effect. he said we have no legal funding for reductions. should sequestration occur, the dod will be forced to place the vast majority of the civilian workforce on administrative furlough. secretary leon panetta said he has notified congress and all and please, giving at least 30 days notice before any furlough. the chairman, buck mckeon, says this is bad, but not unexpected news. the house armed services committee predicted that a sequester would result in layoffs of civilian employees. the house has passed legislation to avoid the white house. democrats have blocked it. here's what president obama had to say about the
to the index you will find no mention of hugh jackson. my other bet if you go to the biology bets in high school. you find no mention of the word. i just looked at buy byingly for the -- montana state university. great textbooks. but i didn't see any mention of hugh jacks. it's as it f because we meaning scientists no longer believe it. it we don't have to think about it. it's as if we historians because we know it was so awful we can somehow pretended that it wasn't part of american culture. early 20th century america. part of lectures in history. saturday night at 8:00 eastern. when he left office the budget was lower than when he came in. that's the story for us now in a period we're concerned. how did he do that? the economy grew a lot. maybe more than 3%, sometimes. unemployment was below 5%. the budget was balanced due to his own how did he manage to keep make the budget go lower and how did that help the economy? a lot. because he got the government out of the way of the economy. >> tracing the life of the 30th president of the united. sunday night at 8:00 on c-span's q an and a. d
. the media promptly turned this into what jesse jackson termed it as, white man tracks down black man, shoots him in the back of the head. george zimmerman was having his head pounded against the pavement. the way the media played it is that george zimmerman had never been injured, he was stalking him for fun and decided to shoot a black guy, and they cut the 911 tapes. now nbc's being sued because of that. they took the 911 tape in which george zimmerman was specifically asked what is the race of the person that you're following, they said he's black. nbc cut that tape so it sounds like what george zimmerman is saying is it sounds like he's suspicious, he's black. they used this flashpoint incident as an excuse to push liberal policy. here's how it works. they send al sharpton down there to talk about how the sanford police department is massively racist, and that, in general, is just a symptom of the unbelievable racism that pervades america. it's still a huge problem in america. racism happens all the time. as president obama and many others put it, they're really -- al sharpton did this a
has kind of erupted into the discussion about janet jackson and the super bowl and rap music and the "sopranos" and violence and the f.c.c. crack down on obscenity. it feels to me a little bit like right now the state of the debate ises -- there's two sides. one side thinks the pop culture is so bad that the federal government needs to intervene to clean things up. the other side just thinks that it's really, really bad. you know, that's the powlart we have. what i'm trying to do in this book is to say, yes, there may be legitimate questions to ask about the role of violence in popular media and some of us may feel there's too much sex or too much obscenity. but that's not the whole story. and in fact, if you look at pop culture from another angle, the angle that i try and describe in the book, if you look at it in terms of the kind of mental work you have to do to make sense of a television show or video game ordeal with interactive media, the kind of problem solving you have to do, the amount of focus and patience and intellectal exercise you have to work through that on av
and other criteria pollutants. the folks like lisa jackson commission in new jersey when this started and in connecticut and others and so a real strong group of environmental regulators using the advantage of this program rggi to the regulatory programs. huge benefits to consumers to reduce energy bills and i will get into some work that sue has done in a second and the economic benefits, the energy jobs. unemployment in the states and the region are lower across-the-board are lower than the national average and one of the reasons rggi is in areas like the cui energy deployment as well as the manufacturing it's been one of the reasons we've had a little bit more resiliency in the downturn because we are slightly more diversified and its increasing our competitiveness we can say with certainty that our mission approach to reducing emissions is not going to lead to a significant regulation and the short term and the state's racing more towards federal regimes because of some of the changes that we are making so we will come back to that in a second when david gets here to of the 1.1 bi
-- quote -- "barry jackson, boehner's chief of staff, found lew's tone disrespectful and dismissive. close quote. he goes on to say -- quote -- "lew was incredulous when he considered the republican proposal as a whole. the changes they were considering sounded simple, but the speaker's office was laying down general principles and looking to apply them to extremely complex programs. the devil was always in the details. boehner was sick of the white house meetings. he was still mostly the president lecturing. he reported to his senior staff. the other knowing factor was jack lew who tried to explain why the democrats' view of the world was right and the republicans' wrong. look, when you're in a negotiation, it's not the time to have an argument over what you -- your world view and my world view. what you have to try to do is find out aren't there some things we can agree on that are consistent with both our world views, and get us in a position so we can reach an agreement to save the republic from financial disaster? why wouldn't the office of management and budget director, unless he be
of the united states created. andrew jackson basically ended its charter. there's a long history of mistrust in parts of the united states about the central bank and what it is back in the jefferson and hamill 10 days. a lot of the farm state bankers didn't trust the first bank of the united states was kind of acting in the entries. the federal reserve was created years ago and it's got unusual structure, kind of an outgrowth of this history of mistrust through central banking. as the federal reserve board in washington make up of seven governors and a chairman, ben bernanke. and 12 regional fed bank and they're they're all part of this federal reserve system. at the regional fed banks, every bank, every charter bank of the united states has to pain capital in return for the jay david and. but these are not things the way we think of commercial banks. the federal reserve bank of new york is not like citigroup out there trying to earn profits are returned to shareholders. the job is to manage the money supply can be a lender of last resort, which is what the federal reserve did supply can be
secretary of hud alphonso johnson -- off onto jackson and if you would please stand and let us recognize you. [applause] it's my honor to turn the podium back to senator george mitchell. >> six years ago when howard baker tom daschle and i came together to establish the bipartisan policy center through the initiative of jason coombe may, we were dismayed at the extent to which our political process appeared to be in gridlock as a consequence of excessive partisanship and ideological posture. that concern remains and it is heightened today. and american politics has been rough. i frequently cite the example of the presidential campaign of 1800, when jefferson supporters called president adams a hermaphrodite lacking they said the strength of a man or the gentleness of a woman. adam supporters responded that the murder rape and robbery would be taught and openly practice in our country. it was rough we thought when we were there but it has gotten much rougher and tougher today. we at the bipartisan policy center and the members of this commission believe that it is possible for men and women w
hillsdale county, and others like lansing, jackson, monroe county. is there a different role that must be taken at the local level between communities? in -- >> as far as between the law enforcement agencies and the communities? >> the whole issue of security based upon the size situation of the community. >> yeah, you know, i think one of the things that definitely needs to happen is more focus on training. of course, we train police officers that work in schools, but our training's also available the school administrators. so in those community environments, the teams need to be training together. school administration, law enforcement, fire department, they need to be working together in a safety team. >> the principals are the same -- the principles are the same, but there are unique situations, right? one size doesn't fit all? >> i would say that one size does not fit all. there are very unique situations out there, yes. >> thank you. mr. bond, in your testimony you state, and i quote that the most effective way to prevent acts of violation targeted at schools is by building trust
that andrew jackson, they loved emily. she covered everything. the women all liked her and the women's opinions meant more than people thought in washington. i'm only became his acting first lady. she had changed her plea. she was polished. some people thought she was rude and rustic from the country. >> house oversight committee leaders come and tear issa and elisha cummings testify on viability of the u.s. postal service. their testimony came before the subcommittee one week after the post-general announcement of the military five-day letter delivery service. this is 40 minutes. >> i have a statement that i want to give. i'm going to just yield to her friends from the house, chairman issa, try ranking democrat on the elisha cummings. especially in the last months of last year, had a chance to bear down and try to get to -- we got in the red sun in terms of final solution we've made real progress. and when to forego comments initially and ask our colleagues to just go ahead and pick it up from there. again, thank you for joining us. >> thank you. chairman carper, ranking member cobu
epa administered, lisa jackson, nancy, the chair of the white house council on environmental quality come and then governors sebelius, were excited to help launch the center promoting cooperative federalism in climate and energy policy. and i'd like to welcome back in particular the center's founding funders. michael northrop of the rockefeller brothers fund, and stewart hudson of the foundation. without your vision and leadership, we wouldn't be here today. [applause] >> and the support from you and our other funders who are listed in our materials, has enabled the center to convene important discussions like this, and to support the state efforts to address and respond to the impacts of climate change. in the four short years this has launch, the climate center has been recognized as a vital resource for state and federal officials, providing legal and policy analysis, and a forum to share lessons and promote opportunities for progress. let me give you some examples. the center was recently asked to provide recommendations to a new york state task force convened by governor cuomo o
never have an experience like you will when you go through atlanta's hartsfield/jackson airport. >> that is true. >> the hospitality, the real southern hospitality, the ambiance, the warmth of the people, and the food. or everybody knows about pascal's fried chicken you can get at the airport. everybody knows about the teachers that come out of georgia and they go into the peach cobbler that melts right in your mouth and peanuts, pecans, coca-cola, it cannot compare, it is in comparable, weekly air on that issue, i love barbeque every once in a while but i eat some fried chicken every day. mr steven johnson -- stephen johnson, thank you for testifying today. i'm interested in the effects of this merger on union and nonunion employees. you indicated in your submitted testimony that the combination of these airlines will generate substantial net synergies and establish the financial foundation for a more stable company and better opportunities for our 100,000 employees. however, current and former employees may be concerned about how the merger will affect benefits such as their h
, and of course to the representative jackson and my home town representative smith, thank you for adding to the ranking member conyers as well as the members of the committee. i come to you today as many things come as an american, as an optimist, the grandson of an immigrant orphan from mexico who found opportunity in our great country, and as the mayor of the nation's seventh largest city, the community that looks like the texas and the america of tomorrow. immigration for all of us is more than a political issue. it is who we are as americans. from plymouth rock to ellis island and galveston to access to the sandy shores of florida and other rocky coast of california, immigrants have made this the greatest country in the world. today, however, our immigration system is badly broken. but there is hope. this hearing more importantly the bipartisan legislation that i believe can be enacted because of it shows that we are on the cusp of real progress. the president in a growing number of bi-partisan lawmakers have laid the framework for what americans support a comprehensive common sense
at the folks who are leaving his administration, the e.p.a.'s director, lisa jackson, she said the e.p.a.'s role is interestingly -- quote -- "to level the playing field against fossil fuels." secretary chu who is leaving the administration, said he must -- quote -- "boost the price of gasoline to the levels in europe." and secretary salazar who is leaving continues to talk about the fact that the energy strategy showed good results but they have restricted access to federal offshore and onshore oil and gas resources through moratoriums, through blocking permits, through leasing plans, they denied americans billions in public revenue and thousands of jobs. so i stand here saying that the keystone x.l. pipeline is a perfect example of the obama administration's pattern of delaying good projects by requiring excessive red tape. so i come here with you, the senator from north dakota and the senator from alaska, and look to you, the senator from north dakota, and thank you for your leadership, for your determination forks your, for yr fortitude, for you fighting to make sure that we as a
that goes to so many things to the economy of course is a jackson the cost of medicine and it's a detriment to many of our constituents, so i just -- would you give me something back on that to let me know how deep he went into it? one of the things i think the chairman was saying making a part of our inquiry this session the next two years is looking not only at the fda piece of this but looking at this whole thing of the grey market. so i would like to sit down with you if you haven't delved into this and see where, you know, what we might be able to do it together to try to get to the bottom of that because it is a very, very serious problem. a lot of americans do not even know about it. but it's very serious. i want to very briefly go to this whole issue of climate change. the federal guard or the government has a number of efforts under way to decrease domestic greenhouse gas emissions. the success of the gas emission reduction efforts to pay is in large part on the international efforts. however, limiting the fiscal exposure to climate change risks will present a challenge the matter
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